Quick Update.

Whoa! A new blog post within a week. I know. Crazy.

We (aka Tyler and Kent) just recently finished our kitchen backsplash. And surprisingly enough, we had no major issues. After many months of looking at different tile options, I finally decided on a simple grey 3×8 glass subway tile. To keep with our simple/modern design we decided to lay them in a vertical pattern, as opposed to a brick pattern.  Take a look..

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Still to do in the kitchen: Add a floating walnut shelf to the right of the sink, and put walnut plywood around the front and sides of the island.

Sneak Peak at what’s happenin’ now:

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One word. Tile.

Tile. Tile. Tile.

That about sums up this entire post, need I say more?

Well, I guess I’ll have to explain a few details about why tiling in a container can pose some minor struggles. Numero Uno: Corrugated walls. Since the walls in the bathroom are corrugated (layman term: wavy), the floor tile had to be cut to fit. I chose a mosaic type tile, with small pieces, bringing us to struggle dos: Tile cutting. Have you ever tried cutting small, I mean really small tile? I haven’t either, I left that up to the boys. But I hear its a beast.

Check it: Look at those curves.
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After the floor was finished we decided to install our vanities. Main reason being that the countertop installers needed my makeup vanity in place to measure for the countertop. Which brings us to struggle number 3: corrugated walls. <– this being a common theme in our house. Steve, (code name for countertop man) measured and used a laser to determine the shape of our countertop. The result, was surprisingly better than expected.

Here is the finished makeup vanity: (don’t worry about those loose cords just yet)

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Here is a close up of the cut countertop (sorry its a little dark and blurry)
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Here is the double vanity on the other side:

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Shower tile was the next step. Just thinking about it makes me want to cringe. Struggle number 4: chipping/breaking tile.

I chose large 12×24 tiles for the shower walls, which I thought would make the tiling process quicker, due to their larger size. I think this actually made it more difficult. The reason being: cuts. Cutouts needed to be made for all the plumbing. Which meant, round cuts within the large tiles, sometimes on the edges. This resulted in lots of broken tiles. It eventually worked out. (Our shower will thank us later with its double body sprayers and rain shower head)-after 21 days of curing.

Here are those cuts I was talking about.

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but look at the final product…

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And since your all wondering about the toilet… Here it is.

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its a dual flush system to try and counteract the wasted water from the shower. (It just makes us feel better about ourselves)

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Still to do in the master bath: Paint and install trim, Install a thermostat for the in-floor heating, install frameless shower door and standout mirrors. Take a shower.

Happening now: Cork Tile. Posing similar problems. including corrugation, and uneven tiles. More on that later.

In other news: We stepped away from the grout floats to take our squareback to one of our favorite shows in Eureka Springs. Heres some pictures of the trip.

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Kitchen Aid

Just recently some family came over and helped us at the Bright Container House with various projects. Some did some cleaning, some hung a massive beam, and others helped assemble our kitchen. So a big thanks is in order for those who came out, alright here we go.. Thank you, mom, dad, Kent, Sheilah, Dalton, Jesse, Candace, Kevin, Lee, Darcey, Jake, and Aunt Kathy.

Here is a rundown of what has been happening lately at the house. We have most of the kitchen assembled, minus a few doors, and the walnut around the island. We hung some lights, some of which work, and some of which we can’t figure out what’s going on. (Hey.. don’t judge, we aren’t electricians). We painted a few more rooms, and we returned to Ikea for a few more items for closets and some returns.

The first item on the agenda for our family work day was to get the massive, dog-poop smelling (literally) beam out of the house and installed in our entryway.

This is where the beam was attached

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A little measuring and a lot of discussion

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And now its time to place it..

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It is now in place and out of the way of our kitchen..

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Meanwhile inside the house, after some minor cleaning- window washing and vacuuming, it was time to start putting our kitchen cabinets together. We had lots of help..

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The Cabinets are pretty easy to assemble, just add some screws and some wooden pegs, slap some wood glue on there and then fit them together. Here is the glue slapping and the piecing together part.

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After these steps, you then nail the back onto them. Lesson learned (Don’t hand me a hammer and expect things to be pretty)…and this is not just me, but I won’t name the others :). I did however get better after the 10th or 11th cabinet.

To attach the upper cabinets to the wall a rail had to first be put in place. The cabinets then hang on the rail. For the base cabinets against the wall a ledger board was installed and legs were attached.

How many men does it take to assemble legs? In this case.. Three.

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The first cabinets going up..

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Some discussion time. Something is not fitting right. (Long story short: These cabinets had to be removed and modified)

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Kitchen progress..

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The next step was to make a base for the island cabinets to attach to and to install the toe kicks.

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Here is the completed base with our high gloss grey toe kicks

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Placing the island cabinets..

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Finished with that part.

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We also installed some more of our lighting and hooked up more outlets. Here are some of our vintage lighting we used in the house.

This light I found at a flea market for a whole $5 is now hanging in my laundry room.

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And remember this one from Grandpa Charley? This one is now hanging in our entryway

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We are currently working on the flooring in the bottom two containers, and still doing some work in the kitchen. We have purchased our countertops and are awaiting there arrival, unfortunately it will probably be 4-5 weeks until they are installed.

And as always…Thanks for checking it out!

IKEA Overload

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Our lastest venture was our most recent trip to Ikea. It definitely wasn’t the relaxing, grab a few things type of weekend that I thought it would be. I knew that we needed a Uhaul, but what I didn’t realize was that we would need a 26-ft long one. I originally thought that it was a little overkill, but after 12 hours inside of an IKEA, it’s pretty easy to fill one up.

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Before arriving in Frisco, TX, Tyler and I had made all the preparations for the trip:

-money – check (after many hours of back and forth with the bank)

-driving arrangements – check

kitchen design – check

-hotel booked – thought so, but no, no check

-list of items to buy – check for the first night, but not the second

Our plan was to arrive in Frisco Saturday afternoon, with a couple of stops in OKC to pick up Sheilah, Tyler’s mom,  and to shop at a nearby retro shop. Then, we planned to  leisurely make it into Dallas to shop at a few more vintage shops, and then finalize a few decisions at Ikea before heading to bed at a reasonanble hour. The only thing that actually happened, was picking Sheilah up and shopping at one vintage shop in OKC. Well long story short, the reason our plans were altered was because, between Saturday and Sunday, we were inside of Ikea for a total of 12 hours. Needless to say, we never made it into Dallas, and that most of our preparations did not work out.

Even though the weekend was a little stressful we did accomplish a lot. We bought our entire kitchen, appliances and all, our master bedroom closet stuff, a couch, our patio furniture, some storage items, some accesories and more..

Here are some pictures of the trip

Breakfast before the rude awakening of how many boxes we were going to have to load that day..

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Everything you see here, was our first load.. Our Kitchen..

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The kitchen minus the appliances loaded up.

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Round two: This is only some of the second load, a couple carts had already been loaded.

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Everything loaded. We were definitely thankful Kent and Sheilah came along..

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So now that everything is unloaded at the house, 12 hours of Ikea, equals a whole lot of hours of installation…

And other news:

 -The sheetrock is almost complete, after many hours of Tyler, my dad, my uncle Chile, Matt, Kent and others hanging it. We have hired someone to do the finishing touches on it and they should be done this week.

-Our cork floor arrived from Canada today for our bottom two containers

Mini Update!

A lot has happened on the Bright Container House, but they are mostly “in progress”, so for now I am going to post a mini update about our front door and our upstairs storage room door.

I believe the most stressful thing so far has been, picking the front door paint color. I know it sounds a little menial, but it has seriously given me ulcers (ok, I may be exaggerating a bit, but not that much really.)

As you can see from this picture, there have been a few options, mostly unsatifactory ones though. There were maybe 3-4 more not shown in this image. After a lot of imagination we came to a decision. This decision, ended up being the wrong one, but more on that later.

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The first step was to fill in the nail holes with painter’s putty.

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Here is Tyler doing just that…

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The next step was to sand the door

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and then sand some more…

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Whoops, forgot a photo.. but the next step was to tape off the edges that did not need to be painted. Because the interior part of the door along with one of the edges will be stained later.

We then started painting, I rolled and Tyler painted the trim pieces with a brush.

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So fast forward a few days, and repeat these same steps with different paint (since the first paint was a bust) and you get to this..

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We then added some hardware, and I think its gunna work.

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A few additional steps to complete our front entry is to finish the stone work on the sides, add the final cement board trim piece beside the door, paint the trim around the door, tile the “porch”, purchase a door bell and then add the decorative lighting and plants.

Here is the doorbell we have picked out..

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And for the lighting we are going to alter a pre-existing globe light we have to become more suitable for outdoor use.

And it will look something like this..

And then to add a little flair to the porch, I will add our bullet planter, one just like this actually…
image from Flickr.com
Less intestesting, but progress none the less…
Our upstairs storage room door was painted. Steps will be added, and we may decide to add a window later to make it more visually appealing.

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And since I didn’t realize I never posted a picture with the finished cement board siding… Here it is:

 now just a little more stone work, trim around the deck, and deck railing, our exterior will be complete.

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and Now to Polish it Off…

For our main living area’s floor, we decided to go with a polished concrete. This decision saved us in material, and helped us continue with our earth friendly building approach. No sealant or chemicals are used to finish the floor, and it is low to no maintenance, with no future re-sealing or re-polishing.

Architectural Concrete Technologies did the work for us, while Tyler and Matt continued on the siding and other things.

The first step was to fill in the relief cuts with an epoxy. We chose a lighter grey color to contrast with the darker grey concrete.

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When the epoxy is first applied it looks a little messy, but once they start grinding the concrete, it becomes flush with the floor.

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They used a remote controlled grinder with diamond abrasives to do most of the work. To get the final product they had to grind, hone and polish the floors to a 3000 grit polish. We thought we were going to have to stain the concrete to a darker grey, but the color turned out just as we would have hoped.

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Here is a close up of the floor. We had them finish it to whats called, in concrete polishing terms, salt and pepper. Where it is ground down just enough to see a little aggregate.

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One of the greatest parts of the concrete floor can sometimes be its flaws. Small cracks, dings and other imperfections gives the floor more character. In this picture below is an area where more aggregate is showing through. This is caused by the uneveness of the slab.

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This picture shows the slight shine of the floor under the lights.

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Sadly enough, right after the floor was finished and dry, Tyler and Matt had to cover it up with paper to prevent it from receiving any damage during the duration of construction.

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The floor was definitely better than imagined, and we can’t wait to pull the paper back up and enjoy it.

Progress Update!

This post may seem like a repeat, and it should since the bottom story steps are practically the same. So feel free to skip the explanations and just check out the pictures if you have been following along. (Don’t forget to click on the flickr link to the right to see  all of our pictures!)

Progress:

-Metal studs were used to frame out the upstairs, we chose metal studs since they are made from recycled materials, recyclable, and weather, fire and termite proof.

-The outdoor electrical receptacles were roughed in

-Open cell spray foam, with a R-40 insulation value was applied to the top story

-Wafer board and house wrap were also installed

-The flue for the fireplace was ran on the outside of the house inside of a chase wall

-Stained cement board lap siding is currently be installed, we chose this material for its durability and design qualities

Here is a picture of some of the metal studs and the electrical:

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Spray foam application:

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Wafer board and house wrap:

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Cement board siding:

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Other progress updates include:

Our door windows were installed, now its just waiting for paint, which I’m thinking a nice retro green color.

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Matt and Tyler tested the flue’s ability to draw smoke out with success! 

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After a few more full days of siding, the inside progress should finally begin! Now I may get a chance to actually help out…