One word. Tile.

Tile. Tile. Tile.

That about sums up this entire post, need I say more?

Well, I guess I’ll have to explain a few details about why tiling in a container can pose some minor struggles. Numero Uno: Corrugated walls. Since the walls in the bathroom are corrugated (layman term: wavy), the floor tile had to be cut to fit. I chose a mosaic type tile, with small pieces, bringing us to struggle dos: Tile cutting. Have you ever tried cutting small, I mean really small tile? I haven’t either, I left that up to the boys. But I hear its a beast.

Check it: Look at those curves.
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After the floor was finished we decided to install our vanities. Main reason being that the countertop installers needed my makeup vanity in place to measure for the countertop. Which brings us to struggle number 3: corrugated walls. <– this being a common theme in our house. Steve, (code name for countertop man) measured and used a laser to determine the shape of our countertop. The result, was surprisingly better than expected.

Here is the finished makeup vanity: (don’t worry about those loose cords just yet)

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Here is a close up of the cut countertop (sorry its a little dark and blurry)
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Here is the double vanity on the other side:

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Shower tile was the next step. Just thinking about it makes me want to cringe. Struggle number 4: chipping/breaking tile.

I chose large 12×24 tiles for the shower walls, which I thought would make the tiling process quicker, due to their larger size. I think this actually made it more difficult. The reason being: cuts. Cutouts needed to be made for all the plumbing. Which meant, round cuts within the large tiles, sometimes on the edges. This resulted in lots of broken tiles. It eventually worked out. (Our shower will thank us later with its double body sprayers and rain shower head)-after 21 days of curing.

Here are those cuts I was talking about.

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but look at the final product…

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And since your all wondering about the toilet… Here it is.

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its a dual flush system to try and counteract the wasted water from the shower. (It just makes us feel better about ourselves)

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Still to do in the master bath: Paint and install trim, Install a thermostat for the in-floor heating, install frameless shower door and standout mirrors. Take a shower.

Happening now: Cork Tile. Posing similar problems. including corrugation, and uneven tiles. More on that later.

In other news: We stepped away from the grout floats to take our squareback to one of our favorite shows in Eureka Springs. Heres some pictures of the trip.

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Kitchen Aid

Just recently some family came over and helped us at the Bright Container House with various projects. Some did some cleaning, some hung a massive beam, and others helped assemble our kitchen. So a big thanks is in order for those who came out, alright here we go.. Thank you, mom, dad, Kent, Sheilah, Dalton, Jesse, Candace, Kevin, Lee, Darcey, Jake, and Aunt Kathy.

Here is a rundown of what has been happening lately at the house. We have most of the kitchen assembled, minus a few doors, and the walnut around the island. We hung some lights, some of which work, and some of which we can’t figure out what’s going on. (Hey.. don’t judge, we aren’t electricians). We painted a few more rooms, and we returned to Ikea for a few more items for closets and some returns.

The first item on the agenda for our family work day was to get the massive, dog-poop smelling (literally) beam out of the house and installed in our entryway.

This is where the beam was attached

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A little measuring and a lot of discussion

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And now its time to place it..

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It is now in place and out of the way of our kitchen..

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Meanwhile inside the house, after some minor cleaning- window washing and vacuuming, it was time to start putting our kitchen cabinets together. We had lots of help..

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The Cabinets are pretty easy to assemble, just add some screws and some wooden pegs, slap some wood glue on there and then fit them together. Here is the glue slapping and the piecing together part.

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After these steps, you then nail the back onto them. Lesson learned (Don’t hand me a hammer and expect things to be pretty)…and this is not just me, but I won’t name the others :). I did however get better after the 10th or 11th cabinet.

To attach the upper cabinets to the wall a rail had to first be put in place. The cabinets then hang on the rail. For the base cabinets against the wall a ledger board was installed and legs were attached.

How many men does it take to assemble legs? In this case.. Three.

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The first cabinets going up..

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Some discussion time. Something is not fitting right. (Long story short: These cabinets had to be removed and modified)

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Kitchen progress..

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The next step was to make a base for the island cabinets to attach to and to install the toe kicks.

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Here is the completed base with our high gloss grey toe kicks

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Placing the island cabinets..

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Finished with that part.

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We also installed some more of our lighting and hooked up more outlets. Here are some of our vintage lighting we used in the house.

This light I found at a flea market for a whole $5 is now hanging in my laundry room.

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And remember this one from Grandpa Charley? This one is now hanging in our entryway

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We are currently working on the flooring in the bottom two containers, and still doing some work in the kitchen. We have purchased our countertops and are awaiting there arrival, unfortunately it will probably be 4-5 weeks until they are installed.

And as always…Thanks for checking it out!

Paint The World

Its been awhile since the last update.. so there is a lot to catch up on. Since the last update there has been some painting, some assembling, lots of drywall, a little flooring and some more painting. (Be prepared it may be a little wordy, but Ill add lots of pictures for those of you like me)

The drywall in the house is now complete. We went with a smooth finish as opposed to texture to keep with our sleek modern look. And of course, like most of our decisions, we chose the one that is the most difficult. Since every ding will show, we had to be extra careful not to hit the wall and always keep some mud handy.

The next step was to paint, we chose a light grey for the main walls, and a dark grey for the beams (which we recently re-painted since the first color choice was no bueno.) We are happy with our choices… for nowPaint choices have by far been the hardest decisions for me, and after re-painting our front door and the interior beams, I  feel a little like I am fullfilling Sherwin Williams motto: Paint the World. Oh by the way, we have to re-paint both our front door and storage room door. (FYI: don’t just use the sample paint you get from Sherwin Williams, it wont hold up.. Yay for round 3 of painting our door!)

Here is the final drywall before we sprayed the primer. Notice the darker beams, as opposed to the not so eye-pleasing greenish beams below. We are much happier with the darker beam choice. (Also, check out the exposed duct work)

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The beam color before we came to our decorating senses.

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We decided to spray the walls to save some time, but since we did go with a smooth finish we had to back roll during the process to prevent a rough texture from emerging. Here is Kent and Tyler doing just that:

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Lots of painting has been going on, so Tyler and I’s “date nights”  now are spent working on the house. Here is us after our date night theme “Dinner and a little role play” (Alien vs. Predator style)

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We also accomplished some of the prep work for our flooring in our bottom two containers. In the entryway, laundry and utility room container we poured a self leveling concrete floor and in our master bedroom/closet we layed 3/4th inch recycled plywood. In the master bath we installed in-floor electric heating and then poured self leveling concrete to prepare for the tile. Our bathroom also has a few more updates, including: durarock installation in the shower surround, and the plumbing for our shower head and sprayers. Our tub was also put in place upstairs.

Before (entryway/laundry/utility room)

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Here is Tyler pouring the self-leveling concrete.

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While Kent and I (mainly Kent) mixed it up. (sorry about the picture, it was dark outside.)

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The finish product, it is now ready for cork.

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This is the master bedroom and closet floor before the plywood.

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Tyler cutting the plywood

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Here is the dirty plywood floor (Since it was re-used), Tyler’s mom recently cleaned it for us, so it is almost ready for cork.

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Here is the shower plumbling: There are two body sprayers, a shower head, and a rain shower in our master shower.

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The durarock in the shower

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In-floor heating being installed

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Bathtub upstairs

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hmm.. lets see.. what else has been done..

Oh! Exciting news… I assembled our Ikea patio furniture over the weekend, and it looks great. Now we have a spot to eat when we are working on the house, instead of using un-ordinary things for our chair and tables, like a paint bucket and a step ladder.

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Can’t wait till we live here so we can enjoy this deck.

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The deck is still not complete, we have purchased our railing and should be starting on that soon.

Now some decorating decisions! Check out our bathroom tile..

The pebble tile will be the floor tile in our shower, and the larger light grey tile will be our wall tile in our shower and around the stall area. The glass tile is our accent tile, and the dark grey is our main floor tile.

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Im sure there are other updates I am forgetting about, but the next time I have time to post again I’ll add them in. As for the next post.. it should hopefully include: bathroom tile, kitchen install, and lighting.

Sneak Peak:

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IKEA Overload

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Our lastest venture was our most recent trip to Ikea. It definitely wasn’t the relaxing, grab a few things type of weekend that I thought it would be. I knew that we needed a Uhaul, but what I didn’t realize was that we would need a 26-ft long one. I originally thought that it was a little overkill, but after 12 hours inside of an IKEA, it’s pretty easy to fill one up.

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Before arriving in Frisco, TX, Tyler and I had made all the preparations for the trip:

-money – check (after many hours of back and forth with the bank)

-driving arrangements – check

kitchen design – check

-hotel booked – thought so, but no, no check

-list of items to buy – check for the first night, but not the second

Our plan was to arrive in Frisco Saturday afternoon, with a couple of stops in OKC to pick up Sheilah, Tyler’s mom,  and to shop at a nearby retro shop. Then, we planned to  leisurely make it into Dallas to shop at a few more vintage shops, and then finalize a few decisions at Ikea before heading to bed at a reasonanble hour. The only thing that actually happened, was picking Sheilah up and shopping at one vintage shop in OKC. Well long story short, the reason our plans were altered was because, between Saturday and Sunday, we were inside of Ikea for a total of 12 hours. Needless to say, we never made it into Dallas, and that most of our preparations did not work out.

Even though the weekend was a little stressful we did accomplish a lot. We bought our entire kitchen, appliances and all, our master bedroom closet stuff, a couch, our patio furniture, some storage items, some accesories and more..

Here are some pictures of the trip

Breakfast before the rude awakening of how many boxes we were going to have to load that day..

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Everything you see here, was our first load.. Our Kitchen..

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The kitchen minus the appliances loaded up.

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Round two: This is only some of the second load, a couple carts had already been loaded.

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Everything loaded. We were definitely thankful Kent and Sheilah came along..

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So now that everything is unloaded at the house, 12 hours of Ikea, equals a whole lot of hours of installation…

And other news:

 -The sheetrock is almost complete, after many hours of Tyler, my dad, my uncle Chile, Matt, Kent and others hanging it. We have hired someone to do the finishing touches on it and they should be done this week.

-Our cork floor arrived from Canada today for our bottom two containers

Progress Update!

This post may seem like a repeat, and it should since the bottom story steps are practically the same. So feel free to skip the explanations and just check out the pictures if you have been following along. (Don’t forget to click on the flickr link to the right to see  all of our pictures!)

Progress:

-Metal studs were used to frame out the upstairs, we chose metal studs since they are made from recycled materials, recyclable, and weather, fire and termite proof.

-The outdoor electrical receptacles were roughed in

-Open cell spray foam, with a R-40 insulation value was applied to the top story

-Wafer board and house wrap were also installed

-The flue for the fireplace was ran on the outside of the house inside of a chase wall

-Stained cement board lap siding is currently be installed, we chose this material for its durability and design qualities

Here is a picture of some of the metal studs and the electrical:

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Spray foam application:

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Wafer board and house wrap:

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Cement board siding:

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Other progress updates include:

Our door windows were installed, now its just waiting for paint, which I’m thinking a nice retro green color.

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Matt and Tyler tested the flue’s ability to draw smoke out with success! 

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After a few more full days of siding, the inside progress should finally begin! Now I may get a chance to actually help out…

Rain Collection

Recently Tyler and I purchased a used, 12,000 gallon water collection tank from a guy in Claremore. Our original plans were to buy a new 2,000 gallon tank to help supplement some of our outdoor water needs, but when the larger tank showed up on craigslist for the same price, we could not pass it up. The 35ft tank will be buried behind the house, and will collect the rain to be used inside and outside the house.

Here is a picture of our new tank, it will require just a little rehab work before we can use it. There is a hole we need to patch, and the inside had to be cleaned and scrubbed.

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Here is a picture of the inside of the tank before Tyler cleaned it:

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And here it is after:

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Our roof, given 1 inch of rain will yield 1,108 gallons of water. So with our area’s precipitation average at about 46 inches per year, we should be able to collect enough water to make our purchase worth it. Some benefits of rain water harvesting would include:

-Rainwater is a relatively clean and free source of water

-It is environmentally responsible

-It promotes self-sufficiency and helps conserve water

-It is better for landscape plants due to its lack of Chlorine

-It reduces stormwater runoff

-It can provide an excellent back-up source of water for emergencies (like a Zombie Apocalypse perhaps)

Here is a diagram to show how rain water harvesting works:

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When it rains the water from the roof will flow through the downspouts into a filter screen and into the tank underground. An electric pump will then send the rain water from the tank to a valve box. This valve will automatically switch from rainwater to city water when the tank gets to a preset level. The water will go through a final system of filters before use.